Southern What

Authors Note: Jennifer Paterson passed away on August 10, 1999. The show “Two Fat Ladies” is one of the most entertaining cooking shows. The recipes, the locations, and especially the relationship between Clarissa Dickson Wright and Jennifer Paterson.

Update: March 17th, 2014 Clarissa Dickson Wright has passed away.

Jennifer Paterson and Clarissa Wright are the inspiration behind Olives Place

I have dug this out of my archives and I hope you enjoy it.

Olive

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two_Fat_Ladies

 

Southern What

To be read with a southern accent to achieve full flavor.

 

Southern Cuisine, now there is a phrase that I would never have thought of tagging onto food. Foods that I thought was called “just shut up and eat it”, “be thankful you have it” was always another favorite of mine, and for Sunday supper it was, “don’t go braggin’”.

It is hard for this southerner to grasp that red beans and rice are now be considered a cuisine, or hoppin’ john, and cornbread cooked in a number eight skillet. Food that raised me up good, proper and safe is now being served in the likes of London, England, way across the way.

How did this all come about you ask? How did those foods among others become a cuisine? Well, if truth be told it was a big city, school trained cooks, chefs I do believe. I mean cooking schools, bless their hearts. It is sad to know that their mammas couldn’t love them enough to teach them “Chefs” the workings of a good winter soup.

How did I come to write this you might be asking yourself? Well sit back, sip some cooked coffee and I will tell you of a night that horrified me to my core.

It all started one Sunday night, nothing special about that Sunday. Dinner was done, wine poured and I was ready to settle in for a good murder.  Poirot, with his little gray cells, Inspector Lewis and his Oxford-educated sidekick, even Midsomer Murders, better yet Foyle’s War what would be perfect to calm the nerves.

But that was not to be. Oh no, nothing but the wine was going to calm my nerves. You see, MasterPiece Theatre was being replaced that night.  PBS was having a fund drive with the same dribble they have every six months.  Performances were given by the same 50’s artist, doing the one hit they are known by.  Specials that were filmed ten years ago with the announcer saying “support shows like this”. Which we only get when they want a handout, mind you!

Running through the channels to see what would be worth viewing. I came across an international cooking channel. Interesting I thought Two Fat Ladies. “Hum” murmuring out loud, “It is British made, and having had no problem with British shows before.” I found myself speaking out loud.

Starting to watch I slowly became entertained by the show until one of the two fat ladies stated that she was going to cook a “traditional southern dish”. Perking up I decided to wait to refill my glass of wine so as not to miss anything. What were they going to make I wondered?

Continuing to speak, Jennifer stated “a wonderful southern dish, Hoppin John”

Watching intently to see how the Brits were going to handle a dish, which was in its infancy the main dish not a side dish. Yes, I know today it is used as a side dish.

First, she fried the bacon, bacon mind you. Now, I know some of you might think bacon would have been used way back then. Now mind you, some of the working people might have a bit of salty bacon in the larder, pantry for you Americans. But I noticed she did not have the one ingredient that gives this dish its wonderful flavor.  A smoked ham hock, yes you read that right, a smoked ham hock.

She did get one thing right, mind you. She did soak the black-eyed peas overnight. It’s really easy, don’t ya know. Just put the peas in a deep bowl and cover with water, you be still with them either in the icebox or on a cool shelf.

The next day, or in this case after the commercial break, she took out the peas and commenced mixin’. First in the pot were the peas, water to cover, and chopped onion, which she had smothered in the bacon grease. So far she was tendin’ the peas right nice.

After cooking the rice separately, which pays no mind to me, however, you wish to do it. Either with the peas when they are done, or as a standalone, don’t hurt my mind none.

She had made a few errors along the way, but not bad for someone not southern born and reared. But as soon as I turned my back, she struck. It was a knife in my heart, she hit me hard.

Mixing the ingredients together she had grabbed a bunch of Cilantro, chopped it up real fine like and mixed it in the Hoppin John.

Catching my breath and still able to hear her say, as she presented the final dish, “This ladies and gentlemen is HOPPIN JOHN, a traditional southern dish.

Standing in my family room I found myself screaming, screaming mind you “NO”.

Followed with, “TRADITIONAL SOUTHERN DISH MY ASS BITCH”.  “Cilantro does not and never will be a fixin’ in traditional southern dishes.”

But did she listen? Hell no! She just kept ramblin’.  I needed more than another glass of wine.  Some sippin’ whiskey would calm the nerves but I had let my cupboard go bare of the “good stuff”, so another glass of wine it was to be.

I knew right fast what my lot in life was to be. Teaching people the world over about southern foods.  Not a cuisine, but genuine southern foods. The history, the tales, and of course the right and proper way of fixin’ them, maybe even a picture or two.

What better time to start than now. Using a pad and pencil I started to write. Below are the beginnings of my journal, a diary of sorts.  Recipes and their history mixed with the ways of the southern cook and her kitchen.

First is the black-eyed peas, about 2 cups no exact science needed here. If you have a few more just throw them in with the others. Sort through the peas for tiny pebbles or a bit of dirt, rinse the peas carefully, and cover with water and allow to soak a right nice time, overnight will do it.

The next day, once the peas have soaked up a bit of the water receiving a good night’s sleep, place the peas in a large pot, a smoked ham hock, onion and bring to a boil. On the first boil, reduce the heat and simmer for 1 ½ maybe 2 hours. Remove the ham hock and cut so as not to fill the mouth too full. Stir in 2 cups rice, return the ham and cook another 20 to 25 minutes. Now that it is done, season with a bit more salt and pepper if needed.

Now mind you there are some modern-day southern ways of making this wonderful dish. Cookin’ the rice separately is one, flavor with red pepper flakes will add a bit of warmth for that cold night. Why if company is comin’ you might chop up some green onions, spring onions I think some call them and sprinkle on top. Just to make it look like you had worked hard in the kitchen. And for the love of everything that is right “LEAVE THE DAMN CILANTRO OUT OF IT.”

Now for the next bit of irritation with the Brits, and their cooking shows please stop insulting the baked beans. Baked beans came to y’all as a gift from America. Enjoy the full body of these wonderfully slow-baked legumes, and for the love of Pete, stop putting them on toast. They are a side dish, not the main dish.

Oh, I do have my work cut out for me. I sorely do.

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Dumplings

Dumpling. A ball of dough, originally savoury and served as an accompaniment to meat or as a dessert…A simple, satisfying food, dumplings were boiled and served to extend small amounts of meat. Originally made by shaping small portions from a batch of bread dough before specific mixtures were developed using flour, cereals, pulses, stale bread, potatoes or cheese, sometimes with a raising agent added or enriched with fat in the form of suet, were developed. Local ingredients and method are used across Europe to make a variety of large or small dumplings, plain or flavoured with herbs, vegetables, spices or other ingredients…Dumplings are closely related to pasta. Italian gnocchi are good examples of small dumplings usually grouped with pasta and the spatzle of German and Austria, made from batter simmered until set in finger noodles, also hover between the two descriptions. Polish plain or filled dumplings are also very similar to gnocchi or filled pasta…The name dumpling is also used for Oriental specialties, such as the small filled dumplings of Chinese cookery, related more closely to pasta than European-style dumplings.” Larousse Gastronomique, Completely Revised, and Updated Clarkson Potter: New York 2002 (p. 437-8)

[48] Dumplings of the Pheasant [Isiia Plena] [Lightly roast choice] fresh pheasants [cut them into dice and mix these with a ] stiff forcemeat made of the fat and the trimmings of the pheasant, season with pepper, broth and reduced wine, shape into croquettes or spoon dumplings, and poach in hydrogarum [water seasoned with garum, or even plain salt water].

[49] Dumplings and Hydrogarym [Hydrogarata Isicia] Crush pepper, lovage and just a suspicion of pellitory, moisten with stock and well water, allow it to draw, place it in a saucepan, boil it down, and strain. Poach your little dumplings or forcemeat in this liquor and when they are done served in a dish for isicia, to be sipped at the table.”

[52] Plain Dumplings with Broth [Isicium Simplex] To 1 acetabulum of stock add 7 of water, a little green celery, a little spoonful of ground pepper, and boil this with the sausage meat of dumplings. If you intend taking this to move the bowels the sediment salts of hydrogarum have to be added.” Cookery and Dining in Imperial Rome, Apicius, edited and translated by Joseph Dommers Vehling [Dover: New York] 1977(p. 65-66)

Mushroom Dumplings:

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 cups self-rising flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped chives
  • 1 10.5-ounce can condensed cream of mushroom soup
  • 1 cup chicken stock

Instructions

  1. Directions
  2. Sift the flour, salt, garlic powder and pepper into a medium-sized mixing bowl. Combine the butter into flour with your hands until well incorporated. Add the chives and the soup. Mix together well with your hands to form a soft dumpling dough. Drop the dumpling dough by the tablespoonfuls into the strained liquid with an additional 1 cup of chicken stock. Cook the dumplings for 8 to 10 minutes. 

 

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Conversions

Cooking Measurements

1 teaspoon = 1/6 fl. ounce 1 Tablespoon = 1/2 fl. ounce 1 tablespoon = 3 teaspoons
1 dessert spoon (UK) = 2.4 teaspoons 16 tablespoons = 1 cup 12 tablespoons = 3/4 cup
10 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons = 2/3 cup 8 tablespoons = 1/2 cup 6 tablespoons = 3/8 cup
5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon = 1/3 cup 4 tablespoons = 1/4 cup 2 tablespoons = 1/8 cup
2 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons = 1/6 cup 1 tablespoon = 1/16 cup 2 cups = 1 pint
2 pints = 1 quart 3 teaspoons = 1 tablespoon 48 teaspoons = 1 cup
1 cup = 8 fluid ounces 2 cups= 1 pint 2 cups= 16 fluid ounces
1 quart = 2 pints 4 cups = 1 quart 4 cups = 32 fluid ounces
8 cups = 4 pints 8 cups = 1/2 gallon 8 cups = 64 fluid ounces
4 quarts =1 gallon 4 quarts = 128 fluid ounces 1 gallon (gal) = 4 quarts
16 ounces = 1 pound Pinch = Less than 1/8 teaspoon

F to C Degrees Conversion Chart

225F = 110C = Gas mark 1/4
250F = 120C = Gas mark 1/2
275F = 140C = Gas mark 1
300F = 150C = Gas mark 2
325F = 160C = Gas mark 3
350F = 180C = Gas mark 4
375F = 190C = Gas mark 5
400F = 200C = Gas mark 6
425F = 220C = Gas mark 7
450F = 230C = Gas mark 8
475F = 240C = Gas mark 9
500F = 260C
550F = 290C

Imperial to Metric
1/4 teaspoon = 1.25 ml 1/2 tsp = 2.5 ml 1 tsp = 5 ml
1 tablespoon = 15 ml 1/4 cup = 60 ml 1/3 cup = 75 ml
1/2 cup = 125 ml 2/3 cup = 150 ml 3/4 cup = 175 ml
1 cup = 250 ml 1 1/8 cups = 275 ml 1 1/4 cups = 300 ml
1 1/2 cups = 350 ml 1 2/3 cups = 400 ml 1 3/4 cups = 450 ml
2 cups = 500 ml 2 1/2 cups = 600 ml 3 cups = 750 ml
3 2/3 cups = 900 ml 4 cups = 1 liter

Weight Conversion
1/2 oz = 15g 1 oz = 25 g 2 oz = 50 g
3 oz = 75 g 4 oz = 100 g 6 oz = 175 g
7 oz = 200 g 8 oz = 250 g 9 oz = 275 g
10 oz = 300 g 12 oz = 350 g 1 lb = 500 g
1 1/2 = 750 g 2 lb = 1 kg

Bar Drink Measurements
1 dash = 6 drops
3 teaspoons = 1/2 ounce
1 pony = 1 ounce
1 jigger = 1 1/2 ounce
1 large jigger = 2 ounces
1 std. whiskey glass = 2 ounces
1 pint = 16 fluid ounces
1 fifth = 25.6 fluid ounces
1 quart = 32 fluid ounces

Cake Pan Size Conversions
20cm springform cake pan = 8 inch
20cm square cake pan = 8 inch
23cm springform cake pan = 9 inch
25cm springform cake pan = 10 inch

 

Part 2

More meaningless but useful pieces of information regarding cooking, the kitchen, weights and measures and of course manners.

If you have question concerning on any of the above subjects please feel free to comment and we will answer because we really are smart. 

Part 2

1. If you scorch milk by accident, put the pan in cold water and add a pinch of salt. It will take away the burned taste.

2. When boiling milk, first stir in a pinch of baking soda. This will help keep the milk from curdling.

3. Tasty flavored whipped cream: First whip cream then add 2 tablespoons of flavored jello and continue beating on slow until the whipped cream is right consistency.

4. Leftover ham: Lay ham slices in a baking dish then cover with maple syrup. Refrigerate overnight then fry the ham in butter the next morning.

5. Add a slice of lemon to peeled sweet potatoes while cooking. The lemon will help them clear and free of discoloration.

6. Fill a large hole or sugar shaker with flour and use that when needing to dust surfaces with flour or just pour out a tablespoon, as you need it, this is handy way to keep a bit of flour on hand instead of digging in the flour bin.

7. Use pastry wheel to cut rolled cookie dough in squares or diamonds, much less rolling and very pretty.

8. Rinse measuring cup in hot water before using syrup, oil, etc. Will pour out clean and not stick to cup.

9. Canned fruit is much better if opened and removed from the can an hour or two before using to restore the oxygen.

10. A wire cheese cutter is ideal for cutting chilled refrigerator cookie dough.

 Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2013 Yvonne  Oots

Jo Dunlop

Jo Dunlop

Well, y’all coming from the mountains as I have, and loving fresh caught fish. Especially for breakfast, I just had to have Jo Dunlop into my kitchen. You see she started a project called Fish is the Dish and all they do is talk about fish and the various ways of fixing fish. You might say she has an obsession about fish.

After Fish is the Dish became successful Jo when on to found a website just for mummy’s and their families.  Jo having two little boys 3 years and one that will have his first birthday on 1 April, Olive won’t tolerate joking about that angels birthday.  Just sayin’ y’all.

Her new blog will thrill you with the antics of her oldest child, to her families’ favourite food. You might even catch a good deal on her product reviews.

So enjoy the interview and get to know her through her own words and blogs.  You can also follow her on twitter.

1. Earliest memory of your Mothers or Grandmothers kitchen.

My mom’s kitchen was always clean, she was always just concocting something from what she had left over, and she was very frugal. The very earliest memory was that Mom’s boyfriend at the time was asked if he could paint the kitchen, we went out and when we returned he had painted caricatures on the wall of us all, including the dog. We then painted over it in the kitchen paint but when it was a sunny day, you could always see the outline of the caricatures underneath, which as kids we always found hilarious

2. Do you like to cook?

Love it; it’s my favourite thing to do

3. If not why not?

NA

4. What recipe of your mother or grandmother do you make that sends you back in time watching (whichever one) in the kitchen?

Macaroni cheese and weirdly just made that tonight, I can still smell my Granny’s house when I think about it.

5. What is your favourite herb or spice or both.

Chilli and oregano

6. If you could be a ghost in that kitchen and watch yourself as a small child, what would you tell that child today?

Watch, learn and write down as much as you can, once people are gone, so are their little quirky recipes!

7. Outside of your own country/county, which country’s cuisines do you like or prefer.

Italian and we eat it often, recently had master classes in my house by a visiting Italian

8.  What is your families favorite dish.

Hmm, that’s a hard one, probably spaghetti & ragu

9.  Would you mind sharing with my readers and quick and easy recipe that you make for your lil monsters?

Here’s a quick video they might like – this is a firm favourite and I did this for Fish is the dish

www.fishisthedish.co.uk/recipes/coley-goujons 

10.   I have a old fashion pantry, larder to you brits… Do you recommend people start one and what would be the most important thing in that larder

Oh, I would love one of these; my old house had a really cold cupboard under the stairs that I had shelving put in. I recommend everyone has one and I’m presently working out how I get this in my new house! The most important thing in the larder is actually not a food stuff but order – you need to had it organised, if you can’t see what’s there you miss things and they go out of date or you go buy some new ones and then realise you already have them. See my pintrest board for more organising ideas.

11. Of all the kitchen gadgets invented OLD and NEW which OLD and NEW are you favourite. (One old and one new)

Old is my slow cooker, I use it a lot

 New is my mixer for baking, I love it

12.   If you could teach cooking to the high school level students today… what would be the most important and the least important thing to teach them?

How to choose fish and how to cook it. It is the easiest food in the world to prepare & COOK – the ultimate fast food and oh so healthy

13.   Having agreed to this interview are you afraid that the men and women of your family members might look at you a little different?

No not at all, they all know I’m food obsessed.

Thank You

Olive

 

 

 Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2013 Yvonne  Oots

Rebecca Wallace

I am so glad to have Rebecca visit my kitchen y’all. Of all my neighbours, I worry about her the most.  Why you ask? Well, lean closer and I will tell you a secret about her.  She doesn’t even know who she is most of the time.  She’ll tell you that she is not sure herself some days.   With that family of hers, why there are days I can’t blame her for not knowing who she is. Listen to this inventory: 1 husband, 2 girls (aged nearly 5 and 7), 3 chickens and about 17 fish.

Rebecca’s youngest daughter, Little Miss Sunshine aspires to a dog and the rest of them including her eldest, Little Miss Star, aspire to a bigger house and garden. They currently reside in a small village in deepest, darkest Hampshire but would love to disappear to deeper, darker countryside and live the good life aka River Cottage style. This however is a pipe dream and unless Rebecca or her husband wins that elusive lottery…Well y’all know how that is going to work out.

Now I am quite certain that there was a time when Rebecca was in her right mind. I am also certain that one day her life will return to normal and the world will be none the wiser about any little mishaps that she is going through today.

So, before she slips back into her own world I hope you enjoy the conversation.

1.    What is the earliest memory of your Mothers or Grandmothers kitchen?

Oh my – now that takes me back. I have a very early memory of my Grandmothers kitchen when they lived in a big, big house. The kitchen seemed huge and I remember an enormous cream coloured range (an Aga as they are called in little ol’ England) with an equally huge table. It was always warm and cosy and the white cat liked to sit on the top of the range. There was also a big wooden dresser filled with crockery and table linen. I don’t remember much about the food but I was only 3 years old when they moved to a much smaller house.

 My earliest food memories are probably of Christmas – the enormous turkey, all the trimmings, the flaming Christmas pudding, the ever so slightly soggy sprouts – or it could be just that it’s that time of year and I have Christmas food on my mind!

2. Do you like to cook?

Mmmm – tricky question – shouldn’t be should it really? I used to like to cook. I bought cookery books by the dozen, loved to experiment with new ingredients and tastes – and then I had kids. After boiling and pureeing up every food known to man when they were little (quite possibly one of the most tedious things you can do in a kitchen) I kind of went off cooking and now I simply don’t have the time and energy.  When my other half goes shopping he has the habit of looking through the bargain trolley and bringing home all sorts of bizarre ingredients that I then feel obliged to cook. A challenge I don’t necessarily relish anymore!

3. If not why not?

In a word – children – maybe this will change when they are older!

4. What recipe of your mother or grandmother do you make that sends you back in time watching (whichever one) in the kitchen?

It has to be a classic roast dinner. I remember so well both my ma and my Grandma cooking a roast every Sunday. There were always guests and it was a social occasion. These days it is more of a family affair but I try to copy their methods in part – especially making the gravy – no bisto in this house thank you! Some things have improved though – oil rather than lard for the potatoes – all a bit healthier – mind you it did my grandparents no harm – they lived to a ripe old age despite eating artery-clogging food on a daily basis.

On a more seasonal note making the Christmas Pud always reminds me of being in the kitchen at home – the cinnamon, the dried fruit, the citrus peel and cherries – probably because it was something I was allowed to help with right from a wee toddler.

5. What is your favourite herb or spice or both?

Another tricky question! I love herbs and spices. When I was a child I used to love to go out in the garden and pick the thyme, rosemary and mint for my mother’s cooking and I remember all those Christmassy sweet spices of cinnamon and ginger. Considering my ma’s cooking was pretty traditionally English it was pretty tasty but she never cooked those hot spicy dishes from places like India, Morocco and Thailand that I love now. I adore coriander in salads and sprinkled over curries – it’s so fresh and I also love chilli and I’m happy to have dishes really hot and spicy.

6. If you could be a ghost in that kitchen and watch yourself as a small child, what would you tell that child today?

Watch and learn – don’t just gab away to your mum . Actually, watch what she is doing, learn and remember and then you won’t have to call her every five minutes in the middle of cooking to ask her what the hell you’re supposed to do next.

7. Outside of your own country/county, which country’s cuisine do you like or prefer?

 I love Thai and Indian food but I think my absolute favourite has to be Moroccan cuisine. It is spicy but so delicious and tasty and has that warming food that we need in our cold climate – nothing better than a slow cooked tagine – mmm – my mouth is watering at the thought – and for afters the nutty sweet delights of baklava – yum!

8.  What is your families favourite dish?

 Having said all that about foreign food I think our favourite dish as a family is a good old meat stew (or casserole if you prefer but that sounds far too fancy – stew is more down to earth) – it could be beef or lamb or chicken with different ingredients depending on the time of year and what you have to hand but slow cooked and seasoned right it can be the tastiest dish ever. It also has the advantage that it can be spiced up or down (my attempts at introducing chilli to the children has been mixed – although I have just about avoided setting their mouths on fire) and you can hide all sorts of veggies in there (the kids don’t know it but they’re eating more veg than meat – mwahahaha!) Perfect for families.

9.  Of all the kitchen gadgets invented OLD and NEW which OLD and NEW are you favourite. (One old and one new)

Ooh kitchen gadgets – I love a gadget but what to choose for the best?  The best new gadget has to be my smoothie maker. I luuurve my smoothie maker. Bung some fruit, milk and yoghurt and maybe some honey in it – give it a whizz and open the tap for a scrumptious, healthy smoothie. The kids love it and so do I!  An old gadget – that’s a bit harder – what counts as a gadget? I’m sure years ago a potato peeler was thought of as a gadget – not sure we’d think of it as one now though, and how old is old? I think in my kitchen it would have to be a pestle and mortar – a gadget that has been used in various forms for hundreds if not thousands of years and even now cannot be beaten for bashing up spices and herbs or even nuts – all those essential ingredients to make meals really tasty.

10. If you could teach cooking to the high school level students today… what would be the most important and the least important thing to teach them?

Cripes – I can’t imagine teaching high-school kids anything but if I had to do it – mmmm. I think the most important thing would be to teach them that cooking from scratch is a lot cheaper and healthier than buying ready meals and that it doesn’t have to take a long time – starting with the real basics like how to boil, scramble and poach eggs. The least important thing to teach them – probably how to cook fancy food – nobody needs to know how to cook a soufflé – it’s nice but not necessary!

 

11. I have a old fashion pantry, larder to you brits… Do you recommend people start one and what would be the most important thing in that larder?

Absolutely, I would recommend that everyone should have a pantry or larder. When I was little we lived in a big old house that had an old fashioned walk in larder and it was great – nearly all the food was stored in there (so less messy cupboards in the kitchen) It was always cool and food like cheese and fruit like tomatoes were so much better kept in there than in the fridge where they just get toooo cold. These days that’s not always practical but even now I have one of those pull out larder cupboards that takes loads of store-cupboard necessities like rice, pasta, tinned tomatoes, beans and fruit, flour, sugar and all those store-cupboard necessities you need for cooking. Unfortunately it’s not super cool like my moms was so the cheese has to stay in the fridge though!

12. Would you mind sharing with my readers and quick and easy recipe that you make for your lil princesses?

Why of course I don’t mind sharing a recipe I make for my little ones. How about one of our favourite after school snacks. They’re always so hungry after a long day at school but I don’t like spoiling them with too many candies or cookies so we often have flapjacks which are (reasonably) healthy, cheap and best of all are  super quick and easy to make.

After school Flapjacks:

200g butter (2/3 cup to 1 cup approx.)

330g porridge oats (1 cup +1/4 cup approx.)

6 tablespoons golden syrup

Optional- handful raisins or a grated apple or a handful of chopped dried apricots – or various other dried or chopped fruits to add a bit of healthiness

Turn the oven to 180C.  (350 degrees F)

Grease a shallow baking tin (or for even more time saving use a silicone one- no need to grease!)

In a big saucepan melt the butter with the golden syrup over a lowish heat – once melted stir in the oats – making sure they are all covered and add in the fruit if you are using it.

Squish the mixture firmly into the baking tin –put in the oven for about 25-30 minutes until a lovely golden brown.

Let them cool before cutting into squares.  Easy peasy!  (weight and measurement conversions  are approximate)

13.  Having agreed to this interview are you afraid that the men and women of your family members might look at you a little different?

Are my friends and family going to look at me differently after this interview? No why would they it’s just little ol’ me talking – they’re used to it!

You can follow Rebecca  on her blogs below.

http://rollercoaster-mum.blogspot.co.uk/  https://twitter.com/chickensandkids

https://www.facebook.com/RollercoasterMum?ref=hl

Olive

 

Tidbits and Trivia

Welcome to the attic where you can find all types tidbits and trivia.  On this  page where Tilly and I will put those meaningless but useful pieces of information regarding cooking, the kitchen, weights and measures and of course manners. 

If you have question concerning on any of the above subjects please feel free to comment and we will answer because we really are smart.

So lets get started with a few cooking tips. 

So lets get started with a few cooking tips.
1. A tablespoon of minute tapioca sprinkled in apple pie will absorb excess juice while baking.
2. Rinse raisins, dates, and figs in very cold water before putting them through the food chopper. They will not form such a gummy mass.
3. Put a few garlic cloves in your vegetables while they boil, it will make them tastier.
4. Cook vegetables with one or more bouillon cubes instead of salt it will improve the flavor.
5. Did you know that you can use sweet pickle juice to thin salad dressing or make French dressing with instead of vinegar.
6. When cooking raw beans DO NOT add tomatoes until they are done. The acid in the tomatoes will stop the cooking process. Your beans will be rather crunchy.
7. Do you have a pizza cutter. If so, then use it to cut cookie dough and pie crusts.
8. When making tea, put a few sprigs of peppermint in with the tea, refrigerate overnight and serve chilled.
9. Do you like to fry foods. Instead of using flour use pancake flour or cake flour. Does a great job.
10.Add just a short squirt of lemon juice to your cold water when making rice. It will keep the rice fluffy.

              Part 2

More meaningless but useful pieces of information regarding cooking, the kitchen, weights and measures and of course manners.

If you have question concerning on any of the above subjects please feel free to comment and we will answer because we really are smart. 

 

1. If you scorch milk by accident, put the pan in cold water and add a pinch of salt. It will take away the burned taste.

2. When boiling milk, first stir in a pinch of baking soda. This will help keep the milk from curdling.

3. Tasty flavored whipped cream: First whip cream then add 2 tablespoons of flavored jello and continue beating on slow until the whipped cream is right consistency.

4. Leftover ham: Lay ham slices in a baking dish then cover with maple syrup. Refrigerate overnight then fry the ham in butter the next morning.

5. Add a slice of lemon to peeled sweet potatoes while cooking. The lemon will help them clear and free of discoloration.

6. Fill a large hole or sugar shaker with flour and use that when needing to dust surfaces with flour or just pour out a tablespoon, as you need it, this is handy way to keep a bit of flour on hand instead of digging in the flour bin.

7. Use pastry wheel to cut rolled cookie dough in squares or diamonds, much less rolling and very pretty.

8. Rinse measuring cup in hot water before using syrup, oil, etc. Will pour out clean and not stick to cup.

9. Canned fruit is much better if opened and removed from the can an hour or two before using to restore the oxygen.

10. A wire cheese cutter is ideal for cutting chilled refrigerator cookie dough.Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2013-2016 Yvonne  Oots